Press release: ‘Reckless’ skip company boss ordered to pay almost £25,000

first_img This unlawful waste disposal could have been prevented if the code of practice had been followed. By breaching his duty of care, he avoided the costs and taxes involved in sending waste to a permitted site. After the hearing, Environment Agency officer Tom Pickover said: Owner/operator Robert Walker of Bob’s Skips in Basildon, Essex, failed to check the legitimacy of a haulier who claimed to be working for a genuine haulage company. The driver did not work for the company and was using fake waste transfer notices. The waste was later found fly-tipped at 4 different locations in Essex.Chelmsford Magistrates’ Court heard today that the rogue trader had made a cold call to Walker’s company looking for something to fill his lorry for a return journey.Mrs Sarah Dunne, prosecuting for the Environment Agency, told magistrates that Walker, 54, of Whitmore Way, Basildon, arranged 4 of these deliveries.She told the court that Walker had asked for waste transfer notices but made no further enquiries about the legitimacy of the company and failed to notice the forms were not filled in properly.He also had no idea where the waste was being taken nor did he check that it had arrived at its destination – all part of his duty of care. Due to the inaccurate nature of the paperwork, it was not possible to trace the lorry or the driver.Mrs Dunne said Walker had been reckless and breached the duty of care he had when managing waste. Walker was fined £10,000, ordered to pay £8,300 towards the costs of the clean-up of the fly-tipped rubbish and £6,532 in costs. There was also a £30 victim surcharge.The defendant pleaded guilty to:Between 1 January 2018 and 31 January 2018 you failed to comply with the duty of care imposed by section 34(1)(a) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 in that, being a person that disposes of controlled waste, namely, a skip full of mixed waste, did fail to take such measures as were reasonable in the circumstances to prevent any contravention by any other person of section 33 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 contrary to section 34(1)(a) and (6) Environmental Protection Act 1990.Between 1 February 2018 and 28 February 2018 you failed to comply with the duty of care imposed by section 34(1)(a) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 in that, being a person that disposes of controlled waste, namely, a trailer full of mixed waste, did fail to take such measures as were reasonable in the circumstances to prevent any contravention by any other person of section 33 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 contrary to section 34(1)(a) and (6) Environmental Protection Act 1990.Between 1 January 2018 and 31 January 2018 you failed to comply with the duty of care imposed by section 34(1)(a) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 in that, being a person that disposes of controlled waste, namely, a skip full of mixed waste, did fail to take such measures as were reasonable in the circumstances to prevent any contravention by any other person of section 33 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 contrary to section 34(1)(a) and (6) Environmental Protection Act 1990.Between 1 February 2018 and 28 February 2018 you failed to comply with the duty of care imposed by section 34(1)(a) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 in that, being a person that disposes of controlled waste, namely, a trailer full of mixed waste, did fail to take such measures as were reasonable in the circumstances to prevent any contravention by any other person of section 33 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 contrary to section 34(1)(a) and (6) Environmental Protection Act 1990. We hope this sends out a clear message to waste operators that they cannot take a cavalier approach to its disposal. The duty of care rules are there to protect the environment and legitimate traders who want to do a good job of disposing of waste properly.last_img read more

Congressional report finds toxic metals in baby food brands

first_imgA congressional investigation has found levels of arsenic, lead and other toxic metals in many popular baby foods, including organic brands. In a report released Thursday, a U.S. House Subcommittee said it requested internal data from seven companies, including Walmart and Gerber, in 2019. The data showed levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury, even though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers those harmful to human health. The metals can remain in the environment for decades from past pesticide and herbicide use. Baby food makers and the FDA say the metals are in many foods, and they are making progress in removing them.last_img

Cardinal addesses senators

first_imgThe future of the immigration issue rests not in the hands of those in Washington D.C., but in the hands of today’s youth, a former archbishop said at Student Senate’s meeting Wednesday. Cardinal Roger Mahony, archbishop emeritus of Los Angeles, asked the senators how many of them knew an undocumented student who attended their high schools. Approximately half raised their hands. “We need you, you’re the ones who are going to get this done because you know personally people affected by our current policy which is very broken,” Mahony said. Mahony is currently advocating the Dream Act, a bill that would grant legal residency to undocumented students who attend college, graduate and serve in the military for a minimum of two years. “This act looks at one segment of undocumented people and that’s young people who were brought here at the age of 16 or younger,” Mahony said. “They did not make the choice to come here. They were brought here by parents or relatives.” These young people often graduate from high school and college, Mahony said, but have no where to go from there. “Once they finish college they are at the end of a dead end street because they have no Social Security number of legal status,” he said. “They can’t get a job that is equivalent to their education and training.” Mahony has spoken with many of these “dreamers,” including some attending Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College, and said he feels heartbroken by it. “They say to me, ‘What do I do when graduation comes?’ And I don’t have an answer,” he said. “I don’t have any next step to utilize what they have done and gone through to help them.” The Dream Act is a simple yet highly rewarding way to reform the current immigration laws, Mahony said. However, the federal government did not pass the Dream Act when it was before Congress. Mahony said anti-immigration feelings are running high due to the economic downturn. “In 2000, no one was discussing immigration because unemployment was at 3.9 percent and we needed all those people,” he said. “But every time there’s a recession there is always a new focus on immigration as a problem. In our country we’re really bent on blaming someone for our economic downturns, and we inevitably turn to immigration.” Mahony said this constantly changing attitude is similar to the United States erecting a fence with two signs, one that says “No trespassing” and another that says “Help wanted.” For example, the United States claims it does not want or need more workers, Mahony said. However, the undocumented immigrants often perform the jobs that many Americans refuse to do themselves. “If we moved all the standards of regular U.S. employees and the benefits and wages to agriculture, then a head of lettuce would probably cost $5,” Mahony said. “On one sense, we don’t want these people here. On the other hand we like our lettuce for 70 cents a head.” The last major immigration law was the Immigration Regulation and Control Act of 1986, Mahony said. This act gave a limited amnesty to undocumented immigrants who had been living in the U.S., working and paying their bills for the past five years. Mahony said many church leaders asked the federal government to include plans for the future in the act and the government promised to address that issue later, but never did. “Now we have 11 million undocumented living in the U.S. today, almost all of them living in blended families where some members are documented and some are not,” he said. “And we can’t move them out of the shadows.” The dreamers represent a very small portion of the undocumented, Mahony said, a portion whose talents and gifts are being wasted. In the meantime, he said the only advice he can offer these students is to remain in school despite the discouragement they often feel. “It is better to be educated than not educated,” he said. “As we move down the road and there’s an opportunity for you to become legal, and we’re going to get there, your having a college education is extremely valuable.”last_img read more