Serious traffic delays following crash near Drumkeen

first_img Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest Facebook WhatsApp Serious traffic delays following crash near Drumkeen Twittercenter_img Pinterest Previous articleBlaney elected in MilfordNext articleSam Moffett wins Cavan Stages Rally with Declan Boyle in 2nd News Highland There are severe traffic delays in the vicinity of Drumkeen following a collision, with traffic travelling from Letterkenny towards Ballybofey particularly badly affected.There are no reports of serious injuries, but emergency services are at the scene, and gardai are assessing the situation. Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme By News Highland – May 26, 2019 Homepage BannerNews Community Enhancement Programme open for applications last_img read more

Amazon to open non-Whole Foods grocery chain

first_imgablokhin/iStock(SEATTLE) — Amazon, which bought Whole Foods in 2017 for about $13.7 billion, is planning to open a separate grocery chain, beginning in Los Angeles, according to The Wall Street Journal.Sources familiar with the project told The Journal the first new store could open at the end of 2019 and that talks are underway to add locations in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, Chicago, San Francisco and Seattle, where the company is based. Amazon, which at the end of January reported a quarterly profit in excess of $3 billion as revenue surged 20 percent to almost $72.4 billion, also is considering acquiring regional grocery chains.The new grocery stores are expected to offer a variety of products at lower price points than many of those carried by Whole Foods, which, according to the company’s website, has 497 locations — 476 in the U.S., 14 in Canada, seven in the U.K. — and employs 89,000 people.Amazon recently abandoned plans to open a massive office in New York City that, the company said, would have created tens of thousands of jobs.Politicians and business leaders this week composed an open letter to CEO Jeff Bezos begging him to reconsider.When trading concluded on Friday, Amazon’s market cap was more than $821.1 billion.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Commercial Driver’s License Instructor

first_imgHigh school diplomaValid commercial driver’s license (CDL) required5 years of proven experience in commercial truck drivingAble to operate the electric lift, hand trucks, and palletjacksSkilled at driving and parking large heavy vehicles.Preferred Qualifications7 years of proven experience in Commerical truck driving Description/Job SummaryJob Summary:Plan, conduct and assess instructional activities – to includesafety, proper use of tools, construction math, blueprint readingand introduction to construction trades.Maintain educational records, inventory, and tool controllogs.Track student achievement by coordinating and administeringtests in accordance with acceptable reporting procedures;Fully understand how to operate and safely drive your assignedvehicleProvide hands-on instruction and practical training to includehow you inspect vehicles prior to and following each trip.Provides instruction to adult learners with varying educationallevels, abilities, and backgrounds and is able to appropriatelyadapt and deliver material to multiple experience levels.Uses appropriate technology to enhance student learningoutcomes.Utilizes a course syllabus for each course taught followingestablished institutional guidelinesMakes recommendations for program improvements as appropriateand required.Interfaces regularly with the project team and otherinstructors and attend scheduled meetings.Maintains confidentiality of student records and othersensitive subject matter.Works assigned schedule exhibits regular and predictableattendance.Prepare students to take the exam.Perform related duties as required.Required QualificationsMinimum Qualifications:last_img read more

Organic growth

first_imgLocated in the heart of the Cotswold hills in the picturesque village of Shipton-under-Wychwood, specialist independent flour miller FWP Matthews has been putting its money where its mouth is.The company is owned and run by Paul and Graham Matthews, great great grandsons of the founder Frederick William Powell Matthews, who commissioned the building of the mill, which was completed in 1912. However, the history of the company dates back as far as the 1860s, when Marmaduke Matthews started a small business selling seeds from his barn in Fifield, Oxfordshire.The company now supplies organic, speciality and conventional flours, as well as distributing a wide range of French flours from Moul-Bie. It sources as much wheat from local suppliers as possible and local farmers still personally deliver their wheat to the mill, which currently employs around 38 people.Despite having its feet firmly rooted in the grains of tradition, FWP has recently made a considerable investment in its mill, namely with the building of the new warehouse – The Wychwood Building – which was officially opened in February this year by HRH Princess Royal. Among the family members at the opening were the architects and builders who completed the project, as well as representatives from various local community groups, such as the local football team, the Brownies and the local theatre group, to which FWP contributes money.Alongside the new warehouse, the company is also installing an on-site test bakery, as well as a new blending plant and £50,000 palletiser, at a total cost of around £1.2m. “We had outgrown our existing warehouse to the extent that we had a bit of warehousing we rented about a mile away,” explains joint managing director Paul Matthews, who says a lack of office space had also resulted in the need for a portacabin to house three members of staff. “It took around two years to get planning permission, but we started building in January 2008 and completed in October/November.”The new building provides the firm with a flour warehousing facility and extra office space, and has also enabled them to install the test bakery, which is due to be completed soon. “It will be great for when we have customer days or are working on specific product development for individual companies,” Matthews explains. “It will also be used for quality control, which will be useful for our organic works, as well as our conventional and French works.”The test bakery will also be used to bake test various wheat blends, for product development with customers at their request, principally with Moul-Bie, and for introducing customers to the French products as well as our own, he says. “The flour will come through to the new blending plant and then we can bake-test it. When we have customer or company days, we can then bake-off various products at their request and they’ll be able to do a tasting panel if they like.”FWP Matthews is capable of producing around 600 tonnes of flour a week, but it is one of the smaller mills in the country – the larger being the likes of Rank Hovis, ADM and Allied Mills. As it cannot compete in terms of the volume of flour it produces, how does FWP differentiate itself? “In the last eight or nine years, we’ve specialised in the more premium products, such as organic, speciality French – we do around 50-60 products for Moul-Bie – and the more premium-type flours, saying that we’ll provide standard flours for large bakeries as well,” says Matthews.In terms of trends, he says, value breads are definitely making a comeback, purely on the grounds of cost. “Some organic bread is actually cheaper than conventional branded loaves, but the problem we have is the perception of organic – namely, that it’s expensive.” Matthews believes they’ll be playing a waiting game over the next couple of months to see which way consumers decide to go. The organic trade is difficult enough as it is – and more so in the current climate, he says; production has fallen dramatically, so it is difficult to know how much wheat to buy. “You’ve got major retailers pushing prices down, so at the moment, we’re very squeezed on our organics supply,” he adds.Currency has also had an effect in terms of wheat that’s imported from outside the UK, with regard to TRQs – tariff rate quotas. The wheat only comes without a levy if it’s high enough in protein: if it’s not 15.3% protein, a E94 (£85.35) levy is slapped on it. “Buying organic wheat is extremely fraught, as we’ve had two bad summers and we’ve hardly been able to buy any UK organic wheat this season,” says Matthews.”I believe retailers are looking to promote home-grown organic products, and we’re hoping to have a good harvest this year, and that there’s going to be a lot of promotion around 100% organic UK loaves.”There is only one word for why organic wheat does so badly in the UK and that’s ’climate’ – or rather unsuitable climate. “You can grow it, but at the end of the day, to make a loaf of bread, you need a certain amount of protein and you cannot get it by artificial means. On top of all that, you need a lot of sunlight hours between the beginning of June and the middle of July,” explains Matthews. FWP has sourced organic wheat from the likes of Canada, Argentina and Eastern Europe, as well as the UK.In terms of the recession, Matthews views it as just another challenge. “Obviously we’ve invested heavily in the new facility and we’ve just put a new flour tanker on the road,” he says. “I think that, although it is tough, there will be tremendous opportunities for us. We have many advantages, not least that we are a small team – there are essentially only three or four of us that make the decisions.”Matthews believes it is being able to act on decisions quickly that has helped the success of the business. Although the family aspect of the business is important, he says that decisions have to be made for the good of the business, not the family, or that’s where things start going wrong.—-=== Then and now ===Founded by: Frederick William Powell Matthews and now run by great great grandsons Paul and Graham MatthewsHistory: Dates back to the 1860s, when Marmaduke Matthews started selling seeds from a barn in Oxfordshire. Mill completed in 1912New developments: £1.2m investment, including the building of a new warehouse, The Wychwood Building, an on-site test bakery and a £50k palletiser, completed last yearlast_img read more

Cardinal addesses senators

first_imgThe future of the immigration issue rests not in the hands of those in Washington D.C., but in the hands of today’s youth, a former archbishop said at Student Senate’s meeting Wednesday. Cardinal Roger Mahony, archbishop emeritus of Los Angeles, asked the senators how many of them knew an undocumented student who attended their high schools. Approximately half raised their hands. “We need you, you’re the ones who are going to get this done because you know personally people affected by our current policy which is very broken,” Mahony said. Mahony is currently advocating the Dream Act, a bill that would grant legal residency to undocumented students who attend college, graduate and serve in the military for a minimum of two years. “This act looks at one segment of undocumented people and that’s young people who were brought here at the age of 16 or younger,” Mahony said. “They did not make the choice to come here. They were brought here by parents or relatives.” These young people often graduate from high school and college, Mahony said, but have no where to go from there. “Once they finish college they are at the end of a dead end street because they have no Social Security number of legal status,” he said. “They can’t get a job that is equivalent to their education and training.” Mahony has spoken with many of these “dreamers,” including some attending Saint Mary’s College and Holy Cross College, and said he feels heartbroken by it. “They say to me, ‘What do I do when graduation comes?’ And I don’t have an answer,” he said. “I don’t have any next step to utilize what they have done and gone through to help them.” The Dream Act is a simple yet highly rewarding way to reform the current immigration laws, Mahony said. However, the federal government did not pass the Dream Act when it was before Congress. Mahony said anti-immigration feelings are running high due to the economic downturn. “In 2000, no one was discussing immigration because unemployment was at 3.9 percent and we needed all those people,” he said. “But every time there’s a recession there is always a new focus on immigration as a problem. In our country we’re really bent on blaming someone for our economic downturns, and we inevitably turn to immigration.” Mahony said this constantly changing attitude is similar to the United States erecting a fence with two signs, one that says “No trespassing” and another that says “Help wanted.” For example, the United States claims it does not want or need more workers, Mahony said. However, the undocumented immigrants often perform the jobs that many Americans refuse to do themselves. “If we moved all the standards of regular U.S. employees and the benefits and wages to agriculture, then a head of lettuce would probably cost $5,” Mahony said. “On one sense, we don’t want these people here. On the other hand we like our lettuce for 70 cents a head.” The last major immigration law was the Immigration Regulation and Control Act of 1986, Mahony said. This act gave a limited amnesty to undocumented immigrants who had been living in the U.S., working and paying their bills for the past five years. Mahony said many church leaders asked the federal government to include plans for the future in the act and the government promised to address that issue later, but never did. “Now we have 11 million undocumented living in the U.S. today, almost all of them living in blended families where some members are documented and some are not,” he said. “And we can’t move them out of the shadows.” The dreamers represent a very small portion of the undocumented, Mahony said, a portion whose talents and gifts are being wasted. In the meantime, he said the only advice he can offer these students is to remain in school despite the discouragement they often feel. “It is better to be educated than not educated,” he said. “As we move down the road and there’s an opportunity for you to become legal, and we’re going to get there, your having a college education is extremely valuable.”last_img read more

Build in the foothills

first_imgHillside GardensWITH hillside views and recreational facilities soon to be built nearby, the Hillside Gardens estate is perfect for those wanting a new home near nature.Ray White Kirwan owner Nicky Faulks said the Hillside Gardens estate was connected to the popular Greenview estate, but offered more of an exclusive environment.“It’s an exclusive estate in Mount Louisa, tucked up against the foothills,” Ms Faulks said.“Most of the blocks have hillside views and you’re surrounded by nature.”Ms Faulks said Hillside Gardens lured buyers with the small size of the estate, with only 38 blocks available when the estate was released in the middle of last year.“Building has commenced with some homes already completed,” Ms Faulks said.“Fourteen blocks have already been sold and it’s proving very popular.”More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020Blocks range from 416 -657sq m in size, and begin at $157,500.Ms Faulks said their target market was first homeowners and people wanting to downsize, and exclusivity aside, convenience was the area’s next biggest drawcard.“It’s a fabulous location with James Cook University, Townsville Hospital and Lavarack Barracks only a 13 minute drive away,” Ms Faulks said.She said there were also great schools and three shopping centres nearby.In late April Townsville City Council announced plans to transform Mount Louisa into a recreational area as part of their Townsville 2020 vision, after gathering local feedback mid last year.These plans include walking tracks, viewing platforms and barbecue areas, particularly along the ridge line as Mount Louisa is one of the highest peaks in the city.This comes as an alternative to the highly popular Castle Hill lookout and walking tracks.Community consultation will continue to occur during the development of the concept plan, which is expected to be complete in October.last_img read more