Somalia UN partners seek 16 billion to protect millions of lives from

“I am proud that we averted a possible famine last year. Lasting solutions […], however, out of our reach, and much more must be done to eliminate the looming threat of famine in this country,” said the Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, Peter de Clercq, in the Somali capital, Mogadishu.With that in mind, he called for tackling humanitarian needs while simultaneously looking at longer-term solutions. “If we do not continue to save lives and in parallel build resilience, then we have only delayed a famine, not prevented one,” warned Mr. de Clercq.According to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the plan prioritizes immediate relief operations in areas with significant numbers of people living in crisis and emergency situations, and now includes a strategy to address protection gaps for those most vulnerable, such as the internally displaced, women and children.VIDEO: UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, Peter de Clercq, outlines the priorities in the 2018 Humanitarian Response Plan for the country.In 2017, displacement reached unprecedented levels, with food security needs nearly doubling the five-year average. The number of Somalis on the brink of famine has grown tenfold since this time last year. An estimated 1.2 million children are projected to be malnourished in 2018, 232,000 of whom will face life-threatening severe acute malnutrition.To mitigate future crises, humanitarians are working with development partners and Somali authorities to address the underlying causes of recurring crises, including food insecurity and mass displacement.“With important progress made on the political and governance fronts, Somalia is on a positive trajectory, despite ongoing crises. The country has more effective institutions than it has for decades,” said Mr. de Clercq.However, he noted that these gains are reversible and must be protected. “With continued international support, we can break the cycle of recurrent crises that undermine the peacebuilding and State-building process in Somalia,” he concluded. read more

Deepfat fryer row MasterChef judge claims Mary Berrys criticism is an attack

first_imgWallace’s attack comes as the latest series of Bake Off gets under way, with 12 hopeful cooks battling for Berry and fellow judge Paul Hollywood’s approval. Berry told Good Housekeeping about her desire to make children more healthy.”Many people think children must have chips. I don’t think any household should have a deep-fat fryer,” she said. “I never fry a doughnut. If you want a doughnut, go and buy one once in a blue moon. It’s about everything in moderation.”  The Great British Bake Off 2016  Gregg Wallace at his Restaurant 'Wallace and Co' in Putney, London MasterChef judge Gregg Wallace has waded into the deep-fat fryer row, claiming that Mary Berry’s criticism of the kitchen appliance is “an attack on our British way of life”. The Great British Bake Off judge told Good Housekeeping magazine that she does not think any home should contain a deep-fat fryer. She also spoke out against fizzy drinks for children.Now Wallace has launched a withering attack on the 81-year-old food writer, saying that “our nation was built on chips and spam fritters”. He added that Berry’s stance against the appliance “isn’t just an assault on the deep-fat fryer but on the traditional British psyche”. Wallace, 51, said that while “we probably did use the fryer a little bit too much” when he was young, fatty food is fine in moderation. Gregg Wallace at his restaurant, Wallace and Co, in Putney, London, which closed in 2014Credit:REX/Shutterstockcenter_img The line-up for this year’s Bake OffCredit:Mark Bourdillon Writing in The Sun, he said: “Just thinking about it takes me back to happy times when what we call dinner now was known as ‘tea’ and we ate it around five o’clock. Dinner was what you had at school at midday.”The smell of deep-fat frying was universal back then, wasn’t it? It brought families and friends together.”I love Mary dearly but this is an attack on our British way of life. We fry things, that’s what we do. It’s like banning the wok in China or outlawing the pizza oven in Italy. It’s ludicrous.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more